japonisme: roadies

23 June 2009

roadies



We're on the one road, sharing the one load
We're on the road to God knows where
We're on the one road,
it may be the wrong road
But we're together now who cares?
Northmen, Southmen, comrades all!
Dublin, Belfast, Cork or Donegal!
We're on the one road, swinging along, singin' a soldier's song!

Though we've had our troubles now and then
Now's the time to make them up again
Sure aren't we all Irish anyhow?
Now is the time to step together now

We're on the one road,
sharing the one load
We're on the road to God knows where
We're on the one road,
it may be the wrong road
But we're together now who cares?
Northmen, Southmen, comrades all!
Dublin, Belfast, Cork or Donegal!
We're on the one road, swinging along, singin' a soldier's song!

Tinker, tailor ­ every mother's son
Butcher, baker ­ shouldering his gun
Rich man, poor man ­ every man in line
All together, just like Auld Lang Syne!

We're on the one road,
sharing the one load
We're on the road to God knows where
We're on the one road,
it may be the wrong road
But we're together now who cares?
Northmen, Southmen, comrades all!
Dublin, Belfast, Cork or Donegal!
We're on the one road, swinging along, singin' a soldier's song!

Night is darkness just before the dawn
From dissensions, Ireland is reborn
Soon, will all United Irishmen
Make our land a Nation Once Again!

We're on the one road,
sharing the one load
We're on the road to
God knows where
We're on the one road,
it may be the wrong road
But we're together now
who cares?
Northmen, Southmen,
comrades all!
Dublin, Belfast, Cork or Donegal!
We're on the one road, swinging along, singin' a soldier's song! 1

I'd been poring over maps of the United States in Paterson for months, even reading books about the pioneers and savoring names like Platte and Cimarron and so on, and on the road-map was one long red line called Route 6 that led from the tip of Cape Cod clear to Ely, Nevada, and there dipped down to Los Angeles.

I'll just stay on all the way to Ely, I said to myself and confidently started. To get to 6 I had to go up to Bear Mountain. Filled with dreams of what I'd do in Chicago, in Denver, and then finally in San Fran, I took the Seventh Avenue Subway to the end of the line at 242nd Street, and there took a trolley into Yonkers; in downtown Yonkers I transferred to an outgoing trolley and went to the city limits on the east bank of the Hudson River.

If you drop a rose in the Hudson River at its mysterious source in the Adirondacks, think of all the places it journeys as it goes to sea forever -- think of that wonderful Hudson Valley. I started hitching up the thing. Five scattered rides took me to the desired Bear Mountain Bridge, where Route 6 arched in from New England. It began to rain in torrents when I was let off there. It was mountainous. Route 6 came over the river, wound around a traffic circle, and disappeared into the wilderness. Not only was there no traffic but the rain come down in buckets and I had no shelter. I had to run under some pines to take cover; this did no good; I began crying and swearing and socking myself on the head for being such a damn fool.

I was forty miles north of New York; all the way up I'd been worried about the fact that on this, my big opening day, I was only moving north instead of the so-longed for west. Now I was stuck on my northermost hangup. I ran a quarter-mile to an abandoned cute English-style filling station and stood under the dripping eaves. High up over my head the great hairy Bear Mountain sent down thunderclaps that put the fear of God in me. All I could see were smoky trees and dismal wilderness rising to the skies. "What the hell am I doing up here?" 2



(don't miss clive christy's blog to find another blogger who loves prints as much as i do. a continuing source of inspiration and, in the case of this post, image.)

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8 Comments:

Blogger PIGNOUF said...

Magnifique...:)

23 June, 2009 12:48  
Blogger lotusgreen said...

merci beaucoup, mon ami.

23 June, 2009 12:55  
Blogger John hopper said...

Thanks for the great post. Kerouac, what a star! I must have read everything by and about him when I was a teen. Well, him and William Burroughs, but that's another story. And you threw in a Frank Brangwyn!

23 June, 2009 15:13  
Blogger lotusgreen said...

you want to hear something really amazing? preparing this post made me realize that i don't think i ever actually read kerouac before! i mean now this was all around the time when i was 12 and had already decided i wanted to be a beatnik when i grew up. (i had read about them in some magazine)

i started reading zen buddhism, wearing all black, listening to jazz, and writing poetry. 12!

and still, never read him! did read some burroughs but not the man.

yeah frank brangwyn. some of his stuff i really really love and some just does nothing for me.

i should go see if you've written on him.

23 June, 2009 18:02  
Blogger John hopper said...

Haven't got to Brangwyn yet, but it's on the list of to do subjects.

Kerouac is one of those interesting writers who so many people know well, but have not neccessarily read. I wonder whether it really matters whether you have read the books, as long as you get where he was coming from and where he was going.

Strangely, I don't seem to have any problem in picturing you as a proto 12 year old beatnik.

24 June, 2009 02:12  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It reminds me the intense moment when Romano ( Mastroianni ) shouts from his waggon to the Gypsies at dawn to wait for him as they overtake him in songs and music ("Oci Ciornie", 1987).
d

24 June, 2009 04:58  
Blogger lotusgreen said...

john-- you're a riot... and a treasure.

24 June, 2009 12:50  
Blogger lotusgreen said...

d- god--that sounds amazing--but i don't know the reference! sounds like i should!

24 June, 2009 12:51  

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